It has become almost impossible to ignore all the travel options. Multiple sources of information are accessible, lots of people blog about their adventures, offer advice, or write travel guides, and low-cost companies are expanding the possibilities of travel while offering combinations that are literally endless. Being travel-wise can for sure be counted as a crucial skill in modern society. With all the gadgetry we have, we can make it through foreign countries, google cheap accommodations, and so forth. But still, even today lots of people would like to take the “daredevil” approach and step out of the digital nest. They rely on maps and local people, miss buses, get lost, get into exciting situations and enjoy all the adventures that the non-digital world has to offer. Andrew John Ganner is one of those travelers. His almost 30 years of travelling are recorded in travel journals. He was kind enough to schedule an unfiltered conversation with us about why he chooses to stick with old-school ways and what makes non-digital travel unique.

It is hard to believe there are still many fatal, not sufficiently explored diseases in the 21st century. One of them, Ebola, took more than 11.000 lives during a three-year-long outbreak in West Africa. In order to increase the public’s awareness of this issue and help students to understand more about how Ebola is diagnosed and treated, Sadhana Anantha, only 19, has designed a simulation of the diagnostic test for this illness. The way she did it and the feedback afterwards brought her the title of 2016 National Young Woman of Distinction by the Girl Scouts of the USA. This is her story.

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